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Check out these stunning photos from the 2020 Astronomy Photogr



Perhaps more than any other type of photography, astrological photography is just insanely impressive – the degree of patience and control required to get good photos of the night sky, let alone distant stars and planets, is hard to overstate. 

That’s one of the reasons why there are awards dedicated entirely to astronomy photographs each year, and the shortlist has just been released for the biggest gong in this area – the Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2020. 

Nicholas Roemmelt

The Green Lady

This stunning image has it all – aurora borealis dancing in the sky, in a sublime mix of greens and blues, all suspended above an ice-cold lake and the hints of human habitation in the form of that lit-up little town. It’s a bit of a wonder, really. 

Connor Matherne

The Many Jets and Shells of Centaurus A

A jaw-dropping image of the infinite variety of space, with those promintent jets in the centre providing a science-fiction-esque focal point. This looks like something out of Star Wars, no?

Mathew Browne

The Moon And the Shard

The moon hovers ominously behind London’s Shard, all of it lit up perfectly to highlight the building’s consturction in contrast to the marvellou detail captured on the moon’s surface. 

Kristina Makeeva

Iceland

Aptly titled, this photo does an amazing job of balancing the deep, luscious colour of the aurora in the sky against the amazing show it’s projecting into the impossibly clear chunks of ice on the ground. 

Alyn Wallace

Ineffable

This photo takes you behind the curtain, showing a lone photographer taking a picture of an eclipse, and showcasing how remote one must travel to find the best light. 

Ruslan Ilnitsky

Sunspots AR 2741 and AR 2740

The sun’s surface is a bit of a mystery to most of us layfolk, but all know that sunspots exist – here’s an impressive image capturing just two of them, neither hintint at the enormous energy that their appearance actually entails. 

Stefan Liebermann

Desert Magic

A desesrt scene that’s beautifully lit by the smorgasbord of light and stars in the sky above, an entire constellation and galaxy suspended beautifully. 

Kamil Nureev

Dance Over the Swamp

We don’t often think of the Northern Lights as occurring over swamps, but here it is nonetheless, and that placid reflection is the key to this photo’s stellar success. 

Marcin Zajac

Galactic Portal

Once again, here the contrast between land and sky is the key, with the amazing purples and pinks of the night lighting up the frame beautifully, viewed from within a cluster of rocks framing the action. 

Thomas Kast

Painting the Sky

That astonishing selection of colours, lighting up the sky in ways that most of us will never live to see in person, makes for an amazing tableau. We think this picture is named perfectly. 

Stacey Downton

Jupiter Rising

It’s no mean feat to capture the surface of a planet like Jupiter in this way, from such a distance, but this image gives you a great sense of the roiling chaos that its surface would actually be.

Ethan Roberts

Moonshot

This great shot is a miracle of timing, with a wisp of cloud passing before the moon and causing this otherworldly effect – it’s like something out a giallo horror film, and we love it. 

Nguyễn Hoàng Linh

Graded

This amazing timelapse over some paddies is a beautiful reminder of how time’s passing is inevitable, and we particularly love how the exposure concentrates the lights of human dwellings in the frame’s centre. 

Jen Rogers

Milky Way and meteor at Porthgwarra

The boat in the image is a perfect focal point, bridging the two near-symmetrical sides of the composition and drawing the viewer out. We can’t be the only ones who’d love to hop in for a journey, right?

Kirk Paton

Trixy

The photographer’s dog Trixy is the star of the show here, artfully silhouetted in front of a bright and huge moon, the focal length making it seem almost impossibly large. It’s a delightful, fun composition. 

Writing by Max Freeman-Mills. Editing by Dan Grabham.





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More incredible photos from the American West



Photography from the American West never fails to interest us. It’s the dawn of the camera, and photos from that era showcase a world that we think we know, from films, books and games, but which is often hugely surprising in the details.

We’ve gathered another amazing slate of images from the US National Archive, showcasing what life was really like back then, in a time when there was no such thing as an easy day. 

US National Archive

Family portrait

We open with this lovely family portrait, taken in New Mexico in 1895, which shows off a lovely range of clothing and styles, all with that textbook seriousness that posed photos from this era so often showcase. This is a big family group, in front of their log cabin. 

US National Archive

Different means

By contrast, this family is a far smaller one, and you get the sense that their means are similarly reduced in comparison. You can see their homestead in the background, and it looks modest to say the least, although the presence of some horses holds some faint promise for them. 

US National Archive

Hard work

If you want to get a sense for how difficult work could be under the hot sun of Oklahoma, check out some the expressions these women are wearing. From fatigue to sardonic, these cherry-pickers look about as tired as we imagine they feel.

US National Archive

Mucking in 

Fruit picking was a common job, though, and sadly could be done pretty effectively by the child labour that was still extremely common at the turn of the century. There’s something cute about the little trolley being used, but there’s nothing fun about that work.

US National Archive

Quite a herd

We think this a stunning bit of photography, regardless of its age. In the foreground this cowboy readies his lasso for a day’s work, but waits for a signal from his fellow herdsman, who you’ll spot on the far horizon, on the other side of the herd. It’s a beautiful bit of mirroring. 

US National Archive

From a distance

This view from a distance showcases how busy an environment could be in the West when tracks were being laid and settlements prepared. In one frame you have people, horses, carriages and a train all working together to clear the land. 

US National Archive

Nature’s bounty

This shot, meanwhile, is an apt reminder of how pristine the unspoiled landscape could be. Whoever lived in the ranch on the right of the frame, whatever their troubles, the natural beauty all around them must have provided some measure of comfort each day. 

US National Archive

Ways of life

But those modes of living could be seriously tough, as show by these trappers, whose haul of raccoon pelts might fetch a price, but wouldn’t offer enough to upgrade what is a fairly ramshackle dwelling. At least they’ve got some canine companionship.

US National Archive

No shortcuts

If farming was the route for you, hard work lay in that direction, too – this farmer is turning the first sods in his field, with the help of a team of horses, but there’s no escaping how backbreaking it looks. Still, he’s got plenty more to get through. 

US National Archive

Isolation

If you want a portrait of the isolation that the West could mean,  check out this house on the edge of nothing at all, complete with porch and chimney stack. Yet it also shows how quaint and free it could be – a young girl helping to feed the chickens, with a young calf stood by. It’s a lovely domestic scene.

US National Archive

Coastal

Of course, the West wasn’t just an amorphous bit of land – it’s more of time period, and geographically it certainly included the West Coast, as shown by this small village, which you might think was from Scandinavia, but is actually in the San Francisco Bay. 

US National Archive

Sign of the times

And, moving to San Francisco itself, this mean that maritime travel and trade  was still huge, using ships that might seem anachronistic compared to the modernity of the railway, but were very much in widespread use. 

US National Archive

Buyer’s market

Indeed, the seafood that still litter America’s coastlines already popping up – if you think you like sardines, check out this view of the day’s trading in Monterey (now the site of a superb Aquarium and research unit).

US National Archive

A changing world

Away from the coast, though, the world was changing rapidly as industrialisation loomed, and America’s natural resources were some of the driving factors behind people populating the frontier. This mining town shows the sort of community that could spring up around a trove of resources.

US National Archive

Landscaping

And, from a different type of angle, you can get a sense for how drastic the impact was on natural environments immediately. It’s odd to see this sort of change made stark even over a hundred years ago, as it’s the sort of image we’re more used to seeing in modern settings.

US National Archive

Working in the dark

Of course, back then this mining wasn’t being done by huge machines and sophisticated supply chains. This was human work, and this picture shows just how torrid the working conditions were.  

US National Archive

On the horizon

Here we see another type of environmental impact, this time of deforestation rather than mining. Again, it’s shocking to see this scale of natural disruption so many years before concern about this sort of thing became a popular movement. 

US National Archive

Panoramic

You might imagine that panoramic photography is necessarily a recent invention, but this picture proves otherwise, taken in Arizona in either 1899 or 1898. It’s another view of a huge mine, with the full impact on its area laid bare.  

US National Archive

Panning for gold

Of course, while that might be a compelling set of images of the huge impact humans were already having on the landscape in America, we return to the individual viewpoint to close out this gallery. Here you can see a lone prospector sifting for gold – a reminder of the hopes and dreams that drew so many people to the West in the first place. 





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Best 5 iPhone NightMode photos to be featured at Apple Newroom


iphone 11 nighmode

Apple is asking iPhone owners to send in their very best Night Mode photographs so the best 5 iPhone NightMode photos to be featured at Apple Newroom. Night Mode is a feature that was introduced on the new iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max range at the Apple launch event in September.

Any photos you want to submit can be shared with Apple through their social media platforms or via email. They must be in by January 29, 2020.

Apple offers you the opportunity to profit using your phone through this amazing photography challenge or competition.

The company is promoting this competition to feature the best Night Mode photographs taken on their new flagship models iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Maxes. Submissions will be accepted beginning at 12:01 a.m. PST on January 8, 2020, and will end at 11:59 p.m. PST on January 29, 2020. Essentially, the challenge is on as we publish this, and photographs must be submitted by no later than January 29. Entries can be shared on Instagram or Twitter, under the hashtags “#ShotoniPhone” and “#NightmodeChallenge,” or on Weibo.

Photographers ought to specify which iPhone they used to take the picture in the description/ post. Photographs can also be submitted through email to preserve quality, Apple said. They firmly believe that photographers ought to be rewarded for their work, nice of them, and consequently, they will pay the corresponding license fee to the five photographers who win the contest. However, they didn’t stipulate how much photographers would actually be compensated or paid for.

Night mode is a popular feature that was introduced on the new range of iPhones made public in September, the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max. The feature, which naturally enhances the photograph quality in low light conditions, does its magic automatically.

Photographers can choose to submit photos unedited, altered in the Photos app, or edited in 3rd party apps or programs. So photoshop lovers will get a kick out of this. They just have to be taken on the iPhone 11 range of models mentioned above.

For this, Apple has put together a great judging panel and got onboard some very respectable judges that will evaluate and choose the five winning photographs, which will be announced on March 4. Some of the judges are Jon McCormack, whose work has featured in TIME and UNESCO, Malin Fezehai, who has shot for the New York Times, and acclaimed Apple executive Phil Schiller, among others.

The winning photographs will feature on Apple Newsroom, Apple’s website as well as on Apple’s Instagram account. The photos could also be used as part of any Apple digital campaigns, at Apple Stores, advertising billboards, and/or in third-party photo exhibitions. Essentially, a lot of exposure!!

More data is accessible here.



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Stunning underwater photos that will take your breath away



There’s something magical about underwater photos. If you don’t believe us, imagine Nirvana’s Nevermind cover with the baby lying on a rug instead of swimming in a pool.

Stock photo libraries are packed with thrilling underwater shots, but there are lots of gems on Flickr, in Wikimedia and in other libraries too, and you can often use those photos in your own creations too.

Here are some of the most astounding underwater photos we’ve seen; some are astounding because of the moment they captured; others because of the stories of their subjects, and still others because of what they say about what we humans have done to so many species.

Please note that the last photo may not be appropriate for younger viewers.

Pixabay

Polar Bear

Not everything you see underwater lives underwater. Visitors like this polar bear are bad news for seals, because they’re looking for their dinner: for many seals this face may be the last thing they see, as it’s attached to a body weighing as much as 450Kg. Polar bears are yet another species suffering because of humans: climate change is destroying the ice on which they live, and they were classified as a threatened species by the US in 2008.

George Desipris, Pixabay

Grey Shark

Greek-based photographer has made good use of colour in this photo of a grey shark: it looks a lot more sinister than it actually is, because the grey shark isn’t really dangerous to humans unless you wear a swimsuit made of raw meat. Like many marine photographs this one has a sad undercurrent, because like many sharks the grey shark is suffering from declining numbers after years of commercial fishing: while they’re protected species, illegal fishing still occurs.

Aurelien Guichard CC BY-SA 2.0

Humboldt Penguin

Guichard is from London, but you won’t see many Humboldts around there: it’s native to South America, although this particular shot was taken in a bird park in France. You probably guessed that from the background colour: underwater shots in relatively small enclosures tend to be much greener than ones taken in the great outdoors. Nevertheless it’s a superb shot, capturing some really excellent side-eye from its subject.

Sylke Rohrlach, CC BY-SA 2.0

Blue Dragon-Glaucus Atlanticus

Technically this photo is only slightly underwater, as its subject was washed up into a rock pool – but we’re including it because it’s a great example of how otherworldly so many marine creatures can be. This little blue beauty is better known as a sea swallow, blue sea slug or Lizard Nudibranch, which would be an excellent stage name for someone in a band. It’s a small, blue sea slug that floats upside down in water; the blue colouring is camouflage so that it blends in with the blue of water, while the underwater side is silvery-grey. Don’t pick one up if you see one: they deliver a very painful sting.

NOAA Photo Library, CC BY 2.0

Seal Underwater

The NOAA is the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the scientific agency that concentrates on the oceans and the atmosphere. Its Flickr feed is full of amazing images like this one, taken on Hawaii’s Pearl and Hermes reef. We love it because it captures the playful curiosity of the seal really well. This particular seal is a young monk seal, one of two remaining types of monk seal: the third, the Caribbean monk seal, is extinct. This chap is a Hawaiian monk seal, the only seal native to Hawaii and sadly yet another name on the endangered species list.

NOAA Photo Library, CC BY 2.0

Humpback Whale

This beautiful photo of a humpback whale inspecting a diver is all over the internet – and sadly it’s usually posted without credit on wallpaper sites, free photo sites and so on. Once again we’re in the good hands of the NOAA, and this photo helps communicate the scale and majesty of this extraordinary creature. Some humpbacks can grow as long as 16 metres and weigh up to 30 metric tons, which is all the more incredible when you hit YouTube for videos of them hurling themselves into the air. This is one creature you really don’t want belly flopping onto your pedal. 

Dr Elliot, NOAA Photo Library, CC BY 2.0

A Magnificent Siphonophore

If we didn’t trust the NOAA we’d think they’d made this one in a 3D modelling app. The wondrously coloured Siphonophore is a Cnidaria, which is a group of creatures that includes coral and jellyfish such as the infamous Portuguese Man O’ War, and some of them are incredibly big: specimens as long as 40 metres have been discovered. The most colourful ones live in the deepest waters and some are even bioluminescent, glowing when disturbed. They’re predators but they’re also very vulnerable as they break very easily.

Engin Akyurt, Pexels.com

Underwater Woman

Let’s have some art. This striking image by Engin Akyurt is our favourite in a series of underwater shots: we like the composition, the stillness of the model and the contrast between the deep black of the background and the bright red of the model’s dress. Stock photo libraries contain quite a few arty underwater shots – for example, Adobe Stock has a selection of women in brightly coloured clothes and of couples swimming while wearing formal clothes – but we prefer this one: it does more with less.

Tim Mossholder, Pixabay

Purple and Pink Jellyfish

Aren’t jellyfish weird? This could be a space alien, or the pattern made by something leaking ink into water. It’s a brilliantly colourful image by the very versatile Tim Mossholder, whose photos often make great use of colour as in this photo. We don’t know what particular species this jellyfish is, but the combination of purple and pink usually spells bad news for its prey and of any humans unlucky enough to get too close.

Tom Fisk, Pexels.com

Scuba Diver near Brown Turtle

We love all photos of turtles because of their fantastically unimpressed expressions, but we particularly like this one because Tom Fisk’s use of perspective makes it look like the diver is approaching a turtle that’s much bigger than he is. The picture was shot off Komodo Island in Indonesia, which is home to five species of sea turtles – and while this particular turtle isn’t a giant, they can grow up to 2m long and can weigh up to 590kg.

Pawel Kalisinski, Pexels.com

Pink and Brown Jellyfish

Kalisinski has taken some beautiful shots in the warm, clear waters around Mallorca, and this close shot of an otherworldly jellyfish is great: it’s captured not just the weird blobbiness of its subject but the floating tendrils it uses to catch its meals. Although Kalisinski doesn’t name the jellyfish we think it’s Pelagia Noctiluca, a relatively small and quite unusual sight in the Majorcan waters but one you don’t want to get on the wrong side of: those tentacles can cause pain, burning and muscle cramps.

Pixabay

Red Jellyfish

There’s weird, and then there’s Red Jellyfish weird. This luminous lovely looks like a visitor from another planet, and we’d love to know who took the photo, where they took it and what particular kind of jellyfish this is. Sadly Pixabay can only tell us that it was shot in 2013 on a Panasonic DMC-FZ200, which isn’t really very helpful.

Pixabay

Man in Water

Who needs extraordinary creatures when you can get a scuba diver to blow some bubbles from his mask? This unattributed shot from Pixabay works brilliantly because it’s free of context: we can make up the entire backstory and imagine he’s a spy, or he’s just spotted a really big and angry shark.

Philip Bussey, CC BY 2.0

Isla Mujeres

There’s something haunting about man-made things that weren’t designed to live at the bottom of the sea, and the photo sites are packed with fascinating photos of shipwrecks and other vehicles that ended up where they weren’t intended. But as interesting as they are, we’re more drawn to the ruins of architecture and of amazing things like these sunken statues from the Mexican island of Isla Mujeres. It looks like the aftermath of a tragedy but it’s actually a modern art museum, which is pretty astounding.

Salvatore Barbera, CC BY-SA 2.0

Sea Turtle in fishing net

Our final photograph is the saddest: taken by Greenpeace photographer Salvatore Barbera, aka Capitan Giona, it’s the body of a turtle drowned by a fishing net. While much fishing is of course environmentally responsible it still has its victims, and illegal overfishing has brought some species to the very brink of extinction. But it’s not just fishing that threatens marine life. Pollution, especially in the form of plastics, is taking a heavy toll too.





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These stunning award-winning pro photos will blow you away



There are photos, and there are photos. We’ve all taken some holiday snaps at a particularly enviable location, or in a rather picturesque spot, and checked out the images later, thinking that professional photography might not be out of reach after all.

Well, maybe think twice about that – the images you’re about to browse are from the shortlist of Professional shots from Sony’s 2020 World Photography Awards, and to say they’re stunning would be an understatement. 

José De Rocco, Argentina, Finalist, Professional, Architecture, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Angles

This image is all about the clean lines and stunning, bright colours. It’s like something out of a child’s imagination, but is actually just the result of people wanting a splash of colour in their lives. 

Sandra Herber, Canada, Finalist, Professional, Architecture, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Isolation

Here, again, you get a splash of colour, this time in an otherwise white-out landscape. This tiny home looks like it might be encrusted in place, but in theory could be picked up like a trailer and driven away. The yellow of the main cabin is a beautiful contrast to the freezing outdoors. 

Massimo Gurrieri, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Discovery, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Construction

It’s amazing seeing monumental structures in the process of being constructed, and there’s something completely otherworldly about seeing these giant elephant heads in India, robbed of their context, with a worker casually holding one in place. 

Giuliano Berti, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Sport, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Tuckered out

Part of the story of any sport is the exhaustion afterward, whether you’ve won or lost. We love the way this wrestler has so clearly sat down utterly knackered, and the fact that his expression gives nothing away at all about how his own bout went. 

Yelena Strokin, Russian Federation, Shortlist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Growth

This image has something magic realist about it, and certainly seems to be sending a message about the value of reading and book-learning. The mushrooms growing from this tome seem to evoke wizards and witches, but maybe that’s just us.

Elena Helfrecht, Germany, Finalist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

A matter of scale

This photograph is an interesting contrast in scales, with the architecturally complex model on the floor drawing the eye. The table above it is more beguiling, especially when you realise that it’s an inch off the ground. 

Sabina Candusso, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Shorn

We all know the aftermath of a home haircut means sweeping – lots of sweeping. This photo takes that scene and turns it into a lovely meditation on texture, not to mention an ode to a classic-looking chair. 

Alessandro Gandolfi, Italy, Finalist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Mocked up

The models used by trainee doctors to practice their medicine are creepy at the best of times. The colour grading and orientation of this photo makes this scene seem almost like something out of a picture book, or constructed from toys.  

Alessandro Gandolfi, Italy, Finalist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Uncanny valley

If you thought the last model was creepy, try this one on for size. It’s a robot called Alter on display in a robotics museum in Tokyo, and as far as we’re concerned, it’s terrifying. 

Sandrine Laure Dippa, France, Shortlist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Still life

This still life has beautiful colour to showcase in its tablecloth, while the subject, the tuber cassava, is lovingly focused upon and lit to show the wonderful variety of its knobbly crusted skin.

Cecilia Manzanares Vargas, Mexico, Shortlist, Professional, Still Life, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Micro

Bugs under a microscope – it’s not our idea of fun, but the images you can get out of the process are undeniably striking. This black-and-white monstrosity is tiny, but photographed like this, could be a giant space beast for all you know. 

Frédéric duhayer, France, Shortlist, Professional, Sport, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Big air

This kid is shredding it – proving that scooters can get huge air just like skateboards, and making us worry for his safety at the same time. The perspective is brave, and the expression on his face is priceless. 

Denis Rouvre, France, Finalist, Professional, Portraiture, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Portrait

This portrait is of Chantal, a woman from the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the victim of sexual violence perpetrated by soldiers. As part of photographer Denis Rouvre’s Unsung Heroes project she talked about her experience. This photo is a raw reminder of the importance photography can carry as an act of witnessing. 

Sasha Maslov, Ukraine, Finalist, Professional, Portraiture, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

A retro look

We love the look and feel of this photo – you couldn’t tell what decade it was from if you tried. It’s a railroad worker in Ukraine, and we’re fond of how proud she is of that uniform, paired with those spectacular curtains for a beautiful colour palette. 

Jon Enoch, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional, Portraiture, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Captured at work

This might be our favourite portrait in this whole collection, a goldfish seller captured on his bike about to drive away. The lighting is sumptuous, while just taking in all the fish on his stand would keep us occupied for some time. 

Brent Stirton, South Africa, Finalist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Precious

Pangolins are trafficked in sad numbers, and remain extremely endangered. They’re stunning creatures, and extremely beautiful to observe, as this photo demonstrates, picking out the details and outline of each of it scales with lovely skill. 

Adalbert Mojrzisch, Germany, Finalist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Texture

You might be hard-pressed to guess what this photograph is actually of – we certainly were stumped. It’s actually a butterfly’s wings under a lot of degrees of magnification.

Marko Dimitrijevic, Switzerland, Shortlist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Chilly

Bears might be more used to the freezing cold than us, but we have to say we still feel pretty sorry for this chilly-looking customer. The frost in his beard is really detailed, while the black and white gives the whole picture a melancholic air. 

Mauro Battistelli, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Landscape, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Colour grading

The grey of these trees is in wonderful contrast to their orange leaves, while the fallen foliage on the water’s surface give this a really eerie vibe. It’s like something out of True Detective, with the bayou beckoning. 

Peixia Xie, China, Shortlist, Professional, Landscape, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Man’s mark

There’s nothing like a remote road to remind you of the extent to which we have remodelled the world’s landscapes to suit our ends. This winding road with its endless switchbacks is a textbook example. 

Luca Locatelli, Italy, Finalist, Professional, Environment, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Clinical

Similarly, anytime you forget that we’re growing plants, flowers and foodstuffs in almost insane quantities at a time, check out an image like this to remind you that many “farms” don’t look like much like their name anymore. 

Ronny Behnert, Germany, Finalist, Professional, Landscape, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Symmetry

Returning to calmer themes, this beautiful sea gate and two lanterns is shrouded all around by mist to create a scene that wouldn’t look out of place in a Miyazaki film. It’s a lovely, blanched photograph. 

Marco Garofalo, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Environment, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

A family business

It might not look like your own domestic bliss, but this photo of family harmony is delightful. The Bolivian family here have swapped to agriculture because the climate crisis was making their old craft of fishing harder and harder. 

Robin Hinsch, Germany, Finalist, Professional, Environment, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Hellscape

And here’s the climate crisis represented more forcefully – a natural gas flaring site in Nigeria spews flames into the sky, above a landscape that was once vibrant and full of life, and now looks like somewhere to be avoided at all costs. 

Ian Willms, Canada, Shortlist, Professional, Documentary, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Pilgrimage

Again, the industrial background to this image is impossible to escape. We love the bizarre symbolism of this lone wanderer, decked out in gold, making what looks like a pilgrimage toward a promised land that doesn’t hold much allure. 

Nicholas Moir, Australia, Shortlist, Professional, Documentary, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Hell on earth

If the fossil fuels burning don’t evoke the climate crisis, this terrifying image of a true conflagration should. Needless to say, it’s from Australia’s bushfire crisis, and the lone fire truck puts the scale of destruction into proper context. 

Hashem Shakeri, Iran, Finalist, Professional, Discovery, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Bleached

A more peaceful scene, if still somewhat unsettling, is provided by this photograph of Pardis, near Tehran. The blanched-out colours make for a landscape that almost looks unreal.

Yevhen Samuchenko, Ukraine, Shortlist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

True pink

You don’t often see the colour pink in nature, but this superb aerial image of the Lemurian salt lake, Ukraine, shows that where it does arise, it’s simply stunning. The addition of a single person gives you a sense of scale and points out the colours all the more vividly. 

Ángel López Soto, Spain, Finalist, Professional, Sport, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

Athleticism

We love how communal this image is, with these wrestlers training against the sand’s resistance as a group, all striving for the same goal of excellence and victory. You can see how single-minded each is at the moment captured. 

Murat Yazar, Turkey, Shortlist, Professional, Discovery, 2020 Sony World Photography Awards

True romance

We end on a true high note with this photograph of an Iraqi couple taking a boat trip having just been married. The bride picks her way up the rocky beach carefully, her beautiful dress clear and obvious as a beacon, while the groom carefully gets on the boat in the background. One lovely little further detail – in the background, a lone swimmer interrupts the lake’s surface. 





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33 incredibly interesting photos from history



Ever since the camera was invented it’s been a wonderful tool for documenting not just our daily lives, but the history of mankind, from our greatest moments to the worst atrocities. 

We’ve collected some of the most interesting images of all time, taken throughout the decades and showing all sorts of visions of mankind throughout the ages.

US Naval Historical Center Photograph

Operation Dominic nuclear tests

This is a shot taken during Operation Dominic – a series of 31 different nuclear weapons tests carried out by the US during the height of the Cold War. This photo was taken on 11 May 1962 and shows the detonation of Swordfish. This particular test involved anti-submarine missiles and W44 nuclear depth charges designed to deal a blow to Soviet submarines. 

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Archives

Wilbur Wright flies around the Statue of Liberty

Wilbur Wright, one of the brothers made famous for the invention of the aeroplane, caused another sensation with this flight around the Statue of Liberty in 1909.

He had been asked to get involved in special exhibition flights that were being put on in order to celebrate 300 years of New York City. The flight took place on 29 September 1909 and lasted no more than five minutes, but caused quite a stir with onlookers and the press. 

Wikipedia

High-wheeling down the steps of the Capitol building

The American Star Bicycle was a high-wheeler designed with a small front wheel to prevent it from tipping forward. It was originally built in 1880 and this iconic image shows Will Roberston, a member of the Washington Bicycle Club riding it down the steps of the United States Capitol building.  

Photographic proof that even back then people were daredevils on bicycles. 

U.S. Navy

RMS Queen Mary full of troops

During the second world war, the retired British ocean liner, the RMS Queen Mary, was used to ferry soldiers from the States to the United Kingdom to fight for the war effort. Here, the massive ship is seen on 20 June 1945 bringing thousands of US troops home. The decks are certainly crowded. 

New York Public Library/Album de la construction de la Statue de la Liberte

Lady Liberty under construction

The history of the Statue of Liberty is certainly an interesting one. You’ve no doubt seen plenty of photos of Lady Liberty over the years, but have you ever seen those taken during her construction? 

Before it was fully built, parts of the statue were constructed in France before shipping to New York. In 1878, the head was shown off at the World’s Fair in Paris.  Several years later, in 1885, crates containing the main parts of the statue were shipped via French steamer into New York and construction began in earnest. The rest is history. 

Apple

Apple clothing

Apple has been known for creating some interesting, inspiring and impressive designs over the years. There have been plenty of highlights and plenty of flops too.

Once upon a time, in the 1980s, the tech brand also had some pretty special clothing on offer to superfans. We’ll certainly mark this one down in the history books. 

Everett Historical

End of Prohibition

Prohibition ended in the States in 1933, in Cleveland Ohio, the people began celebrating almost immediately. Men were seen dispensing beer from a truck with customers able to call Henderson 8030 for more. 

Realbigtaco/Wikipedia

FA-18 going transonic

This spectacular view is a vision of what happens when a high-speed jet goes transonic. It’s known as a vapour cone and is, in essence, a cloud of condensed water which has formed around the plane as it passes through moist air at high-speed. This F-18 was photographed with a perfect cloud as it pushed into transonic flight. This happens at the point where parts of the aeroplane are supersonic while others remain subsonic. Shock waves and water condensation create a magnificent view of mankind’s high-speed travel achievements.

The first supersonic flight happened in October 1947 when a Bell X-1s reach Mach 1.06 (700 miles per hour), but this image is a brilliant homage to how far that technology has come since. 

Brooklyn Museum

The Bowden Spacelander

The Bowden Spacelander was seen as a marvel of post-war design. It was originally created by British designer, Benjamin Bowden in 1946 and though many were in awe at the time, it wouldn’t go into production until over a decade later, by which time people weren’t as enthused. Only 500 were made, making it one of the weirdest and rarest bicycles ever made. 

Motorola

Motorola remote control

Nowadays we can control our TV viewing with our voices, smart assistants and more. Technology has come a long way. In the 1960s things were a lot different. There weren’t many TV channels for a start. It was in 1956 that Motorola first introduced its transistorised remote control for television.

Motorola wasn’t the first company to release a remote control – that was Zenith Radio Corporation in 1950 – but it certainly made a push towards convenience in the years that followed. This advert was one of many from that time that pushed the ease of use. No more hassle of getting up to change the channel. 

Reddit

Quake II contestants in Lan Party mode

Before superfast broadband, PC gamers got together with their hefty machines and large CRT monitors to play. These LAN parties were serious business and certainly a mark on history that a lot of us won’t forget. 

National Museum of Health and Medicine

Masks for plague prevention

This vision from 1912 shows uniformed workers with special gear to help them avoid catching the plague. These individuals were responsible for research into the plague that struck the Philippines at that time. A rare view of terrifying work and brave people carrying it out. 

William Jennings

The first photograph of lightning

In 1882, William Jennings snapped the very first photo of lightning ever to be taken. Although not the most impressive image of the power of nature, it was certainly a historic moment for photography in general. 

NASA

A selfie from Mars

The human race might well be selfie-obsessed, but NASA would have us believe robots are too. This snap was taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars. An amazing, if slightly dusty view of another planet and a brilliant historic photograph. 

NASA

The first rocket from Cape Canaveral

This image from NASA shows the first rocket to be launched from Cape Canaveral in the 1950s. The rocket would reach new record heights for the time and higher than the current orbit of the International Space Station. Bumper II would be the first of many rockets to launch from this spot and this is a brilliant photo to signify its importance. 

historyinmoment

Niagara Falls frozen 

This photo from sometime in the early 1900s shows the Niagara Falls waterfall frozen over. Quite a spectacular sight, but something that actually happens quite regularly it seems, though not many get to see it in this full glory. 

Dave Smith

The first Disneyland ticket ever sold

In 1955, Disneyland opened its gates for the first time. The first ever ticket was sold to Walt Disney’s brother Roy O. Disney for $1. The first real customer though was a college student named David MacPherson. Mr MacPherson achieved the honour by getting up at 2 am in the morning to join 6,000 other people queuing to enter the park. He was the first proper guest to enter the park and was given a lifetime pass as a reward. 

Public Domain

A bicycle for two 

In 1886, this couple posed for a photo outside the White House in Washington D.C. on this two-seater bicycle. Tandem design has come a short distance since then as have the gear people wear when out and about on their bikes. 

Public Domain

Galileo’s drawings of the moon

Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer who has been famously referred to as the father of several sciences including observational astronomy, modern physics, scientific method and modern science too.

In 1610 he famously published these images of the moon as he had observed it through a telescope. They were released in the Sidereus Nuncius, an astronomical pamphlet which showed detailed observations of the moon and constellations of the stars. Not quite as incredible as the photos of the moon we have seen today, but incredibly impressive for the time. 

Reddit

Daredevil pilot

This photo from the 1960s appears to show an insanely brave pilot manually restarting his propeller in mid-air. It was actually part of an airshow stunt.

The photographer explained:

“I took this in November 1946 and it shows Merle Larson demonstrating a small air show stunt that he did. It appears that he is alone in the plane but there is another pilot (Gladys Davis) flying the plane from the back seat and he does have a rope tied around himself. Merle was a WWII B-24 pilot, flight instructor, inventor and builder of three unusual planes based at Buchanan Field, Concord, California.”

Reddit

One man and his car

This image shows a gentleman aged over 100 years old who has been driving the same car, a 1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom for well over 80 years. They don’t build them like they used to. 

US National Archives website

Harlem Hellfighters

During both the Great War and World War II, African American men and black soldiers fought for the freedom of the world against enemy forces. These particular men were from the 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the Harlem Hellfighters. They won the Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action during their fight and can be seen here proudly displaying the medals. The original image was black and white but has been colourised so the men can be seen in their full glory here. 

PicturesHistorical

Witches from 1875

It is said that this photo shows some Victorian witches posing for a photo in 1875. We have some doubts about how legitimate the image is, but it is nice to imagine ladies of the coven brazenly posing at a time when they wouldn’t be burnt at the stake for their craft. 

Leslie E. Robertson Associates

The World Trade Center under construction

The construction of the famous World Trade Center building began in 1966 and wasn’t finished until 1973. In the meantime, this brilliant view of the towers was captured with sunlight shining through the middle. It’s an awesome tribute to a place where many lost their lives tragically in 2001. 

CLYDE PUTNAM JR. PHOTO/THOMAS ROBINSON

A man buying cigarettes in hospital

In the old days, cigarettes were unbelievably marketed as being good for you. As a testament to this daft time, this photo of a man buying cigarettes from his hospital bed was snapped in the 1950s. What a weird time to be alive. 

Dickenson V. Alley/Lošmi

Nikola Tesla, with his equipment

This photo from 1899 is not only interesting because it shows the magnificent Nikola Tesla, but because it might also be one of the first doctored images of the time. The experiment that the viewer is witnessing appears to show Tesla sitting nearby while his magnifying transmitter sparks large bolts of electricity through the air. 

However, the image is actually a double exposure, which the man himself admitted at a later dark. The sparks of electricity were snapped in a darkened room when Tesla wasn’t there. That photo was exposed again with Tesla safely in the room and the machines off. Still looks impressive though. 

Library of Congress

A child labourer

This striking photograph dates back to 1908 and shows a child labourer working in the mills of South Carolina. The photograph said the mill was full of children working like this but that the “overseer” of the mill claimed they’d “just happened in” to help.

Imperial War Museum

A Suffragette arrested

This photo from 1914 shows the leader of the Women’s Suffragette movement being arrested outside Buckingham Palace in 1914. Emmeline Pankhurst was the leader of the movement at the time and was attempting to get a petition to King George V at the time.  

The Suffragette movement was later successful in getting women the vote in 1918. But this image is a fitting tribute to the hardships women of the time endured while fighting for their rights. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Remains of the World Trade Center

This image was taken in late September 2001 from 1,000 meters above the streets of New York City by a Cessna jet. It shows the aftermath of the attacks of the 11 September and the devastation to the World Trade Center building that’s clearly visible in the middle of the photo. 

Malcolm Browne for the Associated Press

A self-immolation during the Buddhist crisis

This photo dates back to 1963 and is perhaps one of the most instantly recognisable images on our list. It shows Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Mahayana Buddhist monk who set fire to himself as a protest against the persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government at the time. 

The image was one of many historical events from the crisis, but by no means the most shocking thing to happen at the time. 

U.S. Navy

Crash landing Hellcat

This image might be one of the most iconic photos from WW2 and shows a Hellcat that has crash-landed on the desk of the USS Enterprise. The pilot incredibly surprised the burning aircraft without significant injury despite the burning fuel tank seen at the bottom of the plane. 

Netherlands Institute of Military History

Exercise Field Artillery Corps 

These old photos show a magnificent band of troops on exercise. Cheerful chaps in some impressive uniforms. We’d recommend checking out the whole collection as they’re very special. 

Alfred T. Palmer

M3 Lee Tank during training

This image from 1942 shows an American M3 Lee on training exercises in Kentucky. It’s interesting because M3 Lee was one of those tanks that were almost obsolete before it even started being useful. A small main cannon, high visibility, weak armour and more made it ineffective against enemy tanks. 

Tank technology progressed swiftly during the war years and it was far too easy for even brand new tanks to be quickly outclassed by the enemy. 





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58 insanely neat photos of cables that belong in a modern art g



There’s a certain breed of IT worker who has a deep fetish for all things neat and tidy.

The result is a server room with hundreds of cables neatly organised, cable-tied and manipulated into perfect angles. Not only is the outcome aesthetically pleasing, it’s also technically practical. 

We’ve collected some of the best images of these masterfully neat cables for you to enjoy. Perhaps some inspiration while you’re stuck indoors with nothing better to do?

NextLevel/Reddit

Retro gaming setup

Perhaps the neatest gaming setup you’ve ever seen. This image not only features some next level cable management, it also includes all manner of retro gaming machines. Don’t believe us? Just take a look at the shelf above the TV. 

EmphaticallyFrank/Reddit

Subtle gaming setup

This neat gamer went entirely the other way with their cable management. Going as far as installing not one, but two gaming machines on the back of their TV and keeping all the cables nice and neat and out of sight. Seems like a great way to sneak a new device into the house without your other half noticing as well. 

National Energy Technology Laboratory

National Energy Technology Laboratory

This cable porn comes from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, part of the U.S. Department of Energy. It’s good to see that even Government bodies take cable management seriously.

Centro Nacional de Supercomputación

Barcelona Super Computer

This super-computer is a superb work of art, you can tell this setup means serious business.

cablewizard/Reddit

Pathtrack install

This copper colour wiring seems to give the impression of metal pipework and electrical/data wiring coming together in perfect unison.

commandtab/Reddit

Micro wiring

This neat wiring could easily be present in your phone or tablet. Tiny attention to detail ensuring the best results from our digital world.

commandtab/Reddit

Tiny circuit board wiring

This tiny circuit board wiring shows that cable management is a fine art, even at the tiniest level.

Cursed1701/Reddit

Braided cables from CERN

It’s no surprise that CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, needs some serious cabling to keep their research running.

DaleDimmaDone/Reddit

Purple paradise

Thick batches of purple cable neatly line the walls of this rack. You can only imagine the amount of time and effort that went into this setup.

expendable_Henchman/Reddit

Interlaced insanity

A couple more colours and we’d almost have a rainbow of wiring in this photo.

fakerchaos/Reddit

So many colours

So many colours and such precision all in one place.

gamebrigada/Reddit

Service loop

A mass of cables loop their way down a ladder, neatly tied and kept in place.

Gibblegosh/Reddit

Power cable neatness

This photo had Redditors arguing as the angle of the photo makes it look like the cables are going in the wrong holes. Even the internet can’t be calmed by simple neat cabling and zip ties.

GivingAlltheDs/Reddit

Up to the heavens

This is some seriously impressive wiring, wiring that even God would be proud of. A tubular mass of wires take all the data up through the ceiling to where it’s needed.

GnomeChumpski/Reddit

Stairwell pipe-chase

This overhead pipework is pleasantly neat and easy on the eye. We wonder how many people take the time to stop and look up when walking down these twisting corridors.

gunnerpad/Reddit

Purple rainbows

These neat and arching cables clearly took hours of meticulous work to put together. You have to admire the handiwork and the dedication to cable perfection.

he_who_should_stfu/Reddit

German efficiency

This cabling and pipework dates back to the 1930’s and hails from Germany. It’s no surprise to see the Germans being as efficient with their pipework as they are with everything else. Everything in its place and a place for everything.

Imgur

Curvaceous cabling

You have to admire this curvaceous cabling, magnificent lines and a high attention to detail.

Imgur

Baby Rack

It might be tiny compared to some of the other racks we’ve seen, but the cabling here is still impressive.

Improved-Liar/Reddit

Insane cable management

Another neat snap of perfectionist level cable management. Again, this one had Redditors arguing about whether there were enough cable ties being used or too many.

intrickacies/Reddit

The internet

This photo is simply labelled “the internet” but despite the neatness, we’re not too sure there are enough cables here to hold the whole internet.

JamezQ/Reddit

All the colours of the internet

Wonderful domestic wiring captured in a simple photo of a number of ethernet cables neatly arranged on their journey from the home broadband router.

machzel08/Reddit

Video routing needs neat cabling too

Even video streaming and routing needs neat cabling. This Redditor is understandably impressed with their work and with good cause too.

Micky86/Reddit

Cable management is an art

Seeing this cable management, Redditor Bitwaba commented “Cable management is an art, but if to maintain it you have to be an artist, then you’re making it more complicated than it should be.” This single comment sums up almost all the photos in this article.

MouseGiraffe/Reddit

A rainbow of cables

This Redditor attempted to create a rainbow out of their cabling and the outcome is as neat as it is colourful.

p0Pe/Reddit

Small but neat

This wiring is from a self-built PC and shows the dedication to cable management and neatness these enthusiasts have when building their own machines.

Phaune421/Reddit

Google’s TensorFlow Cloud Service

A photo from behind the scenes at the inner workings of Google’s mammoth machine. This wiring is part of the machinery used for machine learning, so you can imagine the data that passes through these wires.

poisonousplanet/imgur

Mean green cable machine

We’re green with envy. This insanely neat cabling is a joy to behold.

Porpoise_of_Life/Reddit

Mellow yellow

Bright yellow cabling curls and curves in satisfying ways, taking data off to where it’s needed most.

proto04/Reddit

Living room pleasure

Neat and tidy cables don’t just belong in the workplace, here a piece of ethernet cabling has been turned into a work of art rather than just an eye-sore.

RafaRamen/Reddit

White and blue is good for you

To the keen eye, this cabling boasts both Velcro ties and zip ties to keep the cables neat and tidy and drive the cable porn enthusiasts insane.

RX-LIFE/Reddit

Datacenter

Ceiling wiring racks help keep these neat cables out of view at this datacenter which you could argue is a shame, but it’s certainly neat and practical.

sirnicolai/Reddit

Multi-core power cable

This multi-core power cabling shows that even power cables can be neatly organised.

stell1315/Reddit

Mobile cabling exposed

A snap of a mobile broadcasting van captured at the London Marathon. Exposed wiring and innards no doubt help with air flow and cooling during the hot days.

suburbanite09/Reddit

Top down cabling

Neat cabling with curves flows down like a waterfall of data. Magnificent and intricate.

sylpher250/Reddit

Pipework to be proud of

Neatness isn’t just for cabling. The organisation of this pipework is as admirable as it is beautiful.

TooEashy/Reddit

Digital TV wiring

This is what it looks like when someone with a high attention to detail wires an apartment building for digital television signals all originating from a single dish.

tuxedo_jack/Reddit

The Cat5-o’-9-Tails

A bored network admin has turned some CAT5 cable into a cat o’ nine tails. This photo gives a whole new meaning to the term “cable porn”.

VerGuy/Reddit

Purple cable porn

This magnificent purple cabling is likely co-axial cables neatly arranged on the inside of a mobile broadcasting truck. A magnificent feat of cabling and tremendous use of cable ties.

whoust/Reddit

Cable or candy?

This colourful wiring could just as easily be mistaken for candy cane.

a_synthesiser/Reddit

Contrived conduits

This beautiful pipework made its way onto Reddit under /r/conduitporn/ and shows that it’s not just wiring that people get obsessive about.

ablindman11/Reddit

Electric meter neatness

This is a transformer rated electric meter for a 2000 Amp service. A neat piece of work by the installer on a powerful bit of kit.

Akibatteru/Reddit

Cables as art

This one looks more like a work of art than a photo of technology it’s just that neat and tidy. There’s no denying the symmetry is pleasing to the eye.

Alejandro Cynowicz/Flickr

The seriously neat server room

Photographer Alejandro Cynowicz says he hates cables, but their company takes the matter of neat cabling extremely seriously.

AlexLex1500/Reddit

The neat green machine

This sort of cabling gets the wiring nerds arguing about what a nightmare it would be if a single cable needed replacing.

AveryLongman/Reddit

Colourful completion

You can almost feel the satisfaction of a job well done when looking at this photo taken at the end of a completed cabling mission. Neat and tidy and everything in its correct place.

Barniff/Reddit

Mapped out cable art

This work of cable art looks like someone tried to map out the London underground using power cables and wall tacks.

BenHippynet/Reddit

Neat and colourful

When airflow is important, there’s even more value to neat wiring than just being easy on the eye.

Brandon O’Connor/Flickr

More mellow yellow 

There seems to be a theme with these cable enthusiasts with a passion for yellow cables.

Centro Nacional de Supercomputación

Barcelona Super Computer

Super-computing in Barcelona is serious business.

tibbymat

Before and after

Many of these images feature some seriously neat cabling, but you rarely get to see any insight into the level of effort that goes into these photos. Well, now you can as this Redditor has shown off what the cable mess looked like originally before they “fixed” it. This fine craftsmanship took six hours of human effort to complete. 

Lavins/Reddit

PC gamers do it best

As PC gamers and builders ourselves, we can always appreciate a bit of neat cable management when it comes to a gaming PC build. This Redditor is clearly a master of sleeved cables and zip ties. It’s stunning. 

greenmiker/Facebook

A musical instrument

Where most of these tidy cable images involve great swathes of cables being neatly tied and bundled together, this one went the other way. This image comes from Facebook’s offices and shows a cable setup that looks like it could be played like a musical instrument. 

DREveritt/Reddit

The Cloud

Is this what the cloud really looks like? A magnificent view of cable heaven. 

four_low

TV production levels of awesome

This incredibly beautiful cable view shows a mass of cables being used at a large TV production facility. A total of 576 ports filled with all the necessary neat cables.  

BobOnTheCobb/Reddit

Service loops

Some might argue that this is unnecessary and some of it could have been done out of sight, but we have to admire the craftsmanship of these service loops. Wonderfully neat and organised cables separated and controlled in the most magnificent of ways. 

T–Ham/Reddit

Four days of work

This impressive mass of cables apparently took Reddit user T—Ham four days to put together this neatly. He said there were at least 378 cables in this setup and his hands were raw by the end, but oh boy was it worth it. 

ZyleanWolf/Reddit

Attention to detail

From massively neat and satisfying cable constructions down to tiny works of art like this. Cable management beauty is everywhere. This photo shows the results of a fine piece of working hardware modding a PlayStation 2. Neat cabling running away from the freshly installed chip. 





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Best 5 iPhone NightMode photos to be featured at Apple Newroom


iphone 11 nighmode

Apple is asking iPhone owners to send in their very best Night Mode photographs so the best 5 iPhone NightMode photos to be featured at Apple Newroom. Night Mode is a feature that was introduced on the new iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max range at the Apple launch event in September.

Any photos you want to submit can be shared with Apple through their social media platforms or via email. They must be in by January 29, 2020.

Apple offers you the opportunity to profit using your phone through this amazing photography challenge or competition.

The company is promoting this competition to feature the best Night Mode photographs taken on their new flagship models iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Maxes. Submissions will be accepted beginning at 12:01 a.m. PST on January 8, 2020, and will end at 11:59 p.m. PST on January 29, 2020. Essentially, the challenge is on as we publish this, and photographs must be submitted by no later than January 29. Entries can be shared on Instagram or Twitter, under the hashtags “#ShotoniPhone” and “#NightmodeChallenge,” or on Weibo.

Photographers ought to specify which iPhone they used to take the picture in the description/ post. Photographs can also be submitted through email to preserve quality, Apple said. They firmly believe that photographers ought to be rewarded for their work, nice of them, and consequently, they will pay the corresponding license fee to the five photographers who win the contest. However, they didn’t stipulate how much photographers would actually be compensated or paid for.

Night mode is a popular feature that was introduced on the new range of iPhones made public in September, the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max. The feature, which naturally enhances the photograph quality in low light conditions, does its magic automatically.

Photographers can choose to submit photos unedited, altered in the Photos app, or edited in 3rd party apps or programs. So photoshop lovers will get a kick out of this. They just have to be taken on the iPhone 11 range of models mentioned above.

For this, Apple has put together a great judging panel and got onboard some very respectable judges that will evaluate and choose the five winning photographs, which will be announced on March 4. Some of the judges are Jon McCormack, whose work has featured in TIME and UNESCO, Malin Fezehai, who has shot for the New York Times, and acclaimed Apple executive Phil Schiller, among others.

The winning photographs will feature on Apple Newsroom, Apple’s website as well as on Apple’s Instagram account. The photos could also be used as part of any Apple digital campaigns, at Apple Stores, advertising billboards, and/or in third-party photo exhibitions. Essentially, a lot of exposure!!

More data is accessible here.



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